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Save Earth ...Seize Federal Reserve Founding Stock

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Standing on Sacred Ground – exposes threats to native peoples health, livelihood, and cultural survival in eight communities around the world. Rare verite scenes of tribal life allow indigenous people to tell their own storie – and confront us with the ethical consequences of our culture of consumption. Indigenous communities around the world resist threats to their sacred places –the original protected lands – in a growing movement to defend human rights and restore the environment.

Standing on Sacred Ground – exposes threats to native peoples health, livelihood, and cultural survival in eight communities around the world. Rare verite scenes of tribal life allow indigenous people to tell their own storie – and confront us with the ethical consequences of our culture of consumption. Indigenous communities around the world resist threats to their sacred places –the original protected lands – in a growing movement to defend human rights and restore the environment.

(above l-r) Standing On Sacred Ground – Exposes threats to native peoples health, livelihood; indigenous people tell stories in tribal life verite scenes & confront us with ethical consequences from our consumption; indigenous communities around the world resist threats to their sacred places – the original protected lands – in a growing movement to defend human rights and restore the environment.

Ten years in the making, In the Light of Reverence explores American cultures relationship to nature in three places considered sacred by native peoples: the Colorado Plateau in the Southwest, Mt. Shasta in California, and Devils Tower in Wyoming. Rich in minerals and timber and beloved by recreational users, these holy lands exert a spiritual gravity which pulls Native Americans into conflicts with mining companies, New Age practitioners, and rock climbers. Ironically, all sides see themselves as besieged. Their battles tell a new story of culture clashes in an ancient landscape.

Holy lands exert a spiritual gravity which pulls Native Americans into conflict with mining companies, New Age practitioners, & rock climbers: CO; Plateau, Southwest; Mt. Shasta; CA; Devils Tower, WY.

In the Light of Reverence follows the struggles of several Indian tribes in trying to protect their spiritual sites which exist as landmarks in our country's landscape. Filmmakers Christopher McLeod and Malinda Maynor discuss religious freedom and how it pertains to Native American spiritual practices under the law.

Indian tribes trying to protect their spiritual sites that exist as landmarks in our country's landscape: religious freedom & how it pertains to Native American spiritual practices under the law.

Sacred Land Film Project — Satish Kumar brings Hindu, Buddhist and Jain perspectives to the understanding of a sacred place.

Satish Kumar — Hindu, Buddhist & Jain perspectives of a sacred place. 

Yellow Monster – The devastating effect of uranium mining on Navajo land.

Yellow Monster – The devastating effect of uranium mining on Navajo land.


 Tribal Elders, Earth Person & environmental personhood

Should Mother Earth should be given personhood & Environmental Personhood & rights to sue Federal Reserve directors & Wall Street central banker warlords whose corporations & military destroy Her?

Central banker warlords kill Mother Earth & us

The international interlocking directorate of City of London dynastic central banker warlords finance war & wage genocide against against indigenous tribes & nations & us, that's what globalism is.

Capital punishment for capitalists

Dynastic central banker warlords ...throne in hell of white racist supremacy ...conquered, colonized & enslaved 122 peoples & countries of color & led / lead the Inquisition ...should they pay for murdering Mother Nature & us?


 documentary that tells the story of a corrupt government, unconscionable greed and a policy of destruction aimed at the Aboriginal Homelands of Indigenous People from the 1940's until today. It is a documentary set against the Indigenous landscape of the Desert Southwest and focuses on lives being destroyed by the horror of uranium mining and effects of radiation...as a government's cruel secret is carried on the face of the wind.

Poison Wind – Landscape of Desert Southwest lives destroyed by horrors of uranium mining & effects of radiation carried on the wind.   

A Buffalo's Trail of Tears – the annual hazing of the last wild & free buffalo.

A Buffalo's Trail of Tears – Indigenous Buffalo Field Campaign efforts to stop the annual white hazing of the last wild & free buffalo.

Join Buffalo Field Campaign on the frontlines of Yellowstone via this immersive, informative, and entertaining short documentary produced by Thia Martin of Redshoes Studio.  Buffalo Field Campaign is the only group working in the field and on the policy front to protect America's last wild bison.

Wild & Free – Saving the Yellowstone Buffalo – Buffalo Field Campaign is the only group in the field & on policy to protect America's last wild bison.

 

Native Americans – People of the Northwest Coast

Native Americans – People of the Northwest Coast


Impact of Nuclear on Indian Country & the Socialism of Nuclear Industry - not insured by private enterprise, only by Gov't ...public pays the price not the owners of nuclear  by Philip Klasky, Lecturer in American Indian Studies & Dr. Carlos Davidson, Dir,. SFSU Environmental Studies. In the first of five parts of a seminar held at San Francisco State University, April 8, 2011, Philip Klasky, Lecturer in American Indian Studies and Dr. Carlos Davidson, Director of the SFSU Environmental Studies Program, lay out the cultural, environmental and historical context of nuclear technology.

(1-of-5) Dr. Carlos Davidson, Dir,. SFSU Environmental Studies: Nuclear Industry Socialism - not insured by private enterprise, only by Gov't ...public pays price not owners of nuclear technology; environmental context.

Impact of Nuclear on Indian Country & the Socialism of Nuclear Industry - not insured by private enterprise, only by Gov't ...public pays the price not the owners of nuclear  by Philip Klasky, Lecturer in American Indian Studies & Dr. Carlos Davidson, Dir,. SFSU Environmental Studies. In the first of five parts of a seminar held at San Francisco State University, April 8, 2011, Philip Klasky, Lecturer in American Indian Studies and Dr. Carlos Davidson, Director of the SFSU Environmental Studies Program, lay out the cultural, environmental and historical context of nuclear technology.

(1-of-5. repeated) Philip Klasky, Lecturer in American Indian Studies: Impact of nuclear industy on Indian Country; cultural, environmental & historical context of nuclear industry, waste & fallout as it impacts tribal lands.

In the second of five parts of a seminar held at San Francisco State University April 8, 2011, world renowned sociologist and anti-nuclear organizer Dr. Natalia Miranova presents the scientific, ecological and social implications of the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters.

(2-of-5) Dr. Natalia Miranova, world renowned sociologist & anti-nuclear organizer, presents scientific, ecological & social implications of nuclear waste & fallout from the Chernobyl & Fukushimsa disasters.


(Excerpted from Standing On Sacred Ground)

(Excerpted from Standing On Sacred Ground)

(Excerpted from Standing On Sacred Ground)

Chile – Hero dog pulls away wounded friend hit by car.


In the third of five parts of a seminar held at San Francisco State University April 8, 2011, radiation biologist Natalia Manzurova tells of her experience as a Chernobyl 'clean up liquidator' - translated by psychologist Tatiana Mukhamedyarova.

(3-of-5) Natalia Manzurova tells of her experience as a Chernobyl 'clean up liquidator' - translated by psychologist Tatiana Mukhamedyarova; the fifth video in the San Francisco State series.

In the fourth of five parts of a seminar held at San Francisco State University April 8, 2011, attorney Andrew Lichterman of the Western States Legal Foundation discusses the difficulties of obtaining accurate information about the emerging impacts of Fukushima and the role of social movements in combating the madness of nuclear power and weapons proliferation.

(4-of-5)  Attorney Andrew Lichterman of Western States Legal Foundation discusses difficulties of obtaining accurate information about emerging impacts of Fukushima & social movements combating nuclear insanity. 

(5 of 5) Panel: World renowned sociologist & anti-nuclear organizer Dr. Natalia Miranova; radiation biologist Natalia Manzurova; attorney Andrew Lichterman & nuclear engineer Ernest Goitein answer audience questions.


Lost Dogs Trailer: A dog captures the world's attention by performing a death-defying & heroic act.

Lost Dogs Trailer: A dog captures the world's attention by performing a death-defying & heroic act.

Satish Kumar talks about the need to care for our planet; ecology, social justice, spirituality science & economy are all related. Protecting soil leads to protecting people; Satish is an Indian activist & editor. He has been a Jain monk, nuclear disarmament advocate, pacifist, & editor of Resurgence & Ecologist magazine. Kumar is founder & Director of Programmes of the Schumacher College international centre for ecological studies.

Satish Kumar – We are Nature; the need to care for our planet ,,,ecology, social justice, spirituality science & economy are all related. 

Mitsuhei Murata, Former Japanese Ambassador to Switzerland, addresses attendees at Coalition Against Nuke's Sep. 20th Congressional Briefing, hosted by the Congressional Office of Congressman Kucinich (D-OH).

MsMilkytheclown1: A Plea for a Total Ban on Nuclear Energy – by Professor Mitsuhei Murata


Thank you for your interest. Please contact your friends & share this info. 

Every nuclear reactor is a nuclear dump where waste is stored, so we focus on America first then locations of every nuclear reactor & dump in the world, since all give you immune deficiency diseases, heart attacks & cancer.

Biden & Dementia Note: Portland Metro Creative Aging & Cognitive Arts Center is not funded at this time. enrollment membership info for our curriculum for students will be available, here.


The Clan of One-Breasted Women

The following is an excerpt from, The Clan of One-Breasted Women; the epilog of,  Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place, written by Terry Tempest Williams ...a powerful personal account of a woman's family life experience with radioactive fallout from the Nevada test site. "I belong to a Clan of One-Breasted Women," says Terry. "My mother, my grandmothers, and six aunts have all had mastectomies. Seven are dead ... I've had my own problems: two biopsies for breast cancer and a small tumor removed between my ribs diagnosed as a borderline malignancy." The Nevada test site was illegally created on the Shoshoni ancestral lands stolen by the U.S. government in violation of the 1863 Treaty of Ruby Valley which it signed with the Shoshoni guaranteeing the sovereignty of the Shoshoni people over their traditional homeland, Newe Segobia.)

One night, I dreamed women from all over the world were circling a blazing fire in the desert. They spoke of change, of how they hold the moon in their bellies and wax and wane with its phases. They mocked at the presumption of even-tempered beings and made promises that they would never fear the witch inside themselves. The women danced wildly as sparks broke away from the flames and entered the night sky as stars.

And they sang a song given to them by Shoshoni grandmothers:

Ah ne nah, nah ... Consider the rabbits
nin nah nah ... How gently they walk on the earth
Ah ne nah, nah ... Consider the rabbits
nin nah nah ... How gently they walk on the earth
Nyaga mutzi ... We remember them
oh ne nay ... We can walk gently also
Nyaga mutzi ... We remember them
oh ne nay ... We can walk gently also

The women danced and drummed and sang for weeks, preparing themselves for what was to come. They would reclaim the desert for the sake of their children, for the sake of the land. A few miles downwind from the fire circle, bombs were being tested. Rabbits felt the tremors. Their soft leather pads on paws and feet recognized the shaking sands while the roots of mesquite and sage were smoldering. Rocks were hot from the inside out and dust devils hummed unnaturally. And each time there was another nuclear test, ravens watched the desert heave. Stretch marks appeared. The land was losing its muscle.

The women couldn't bear it any longer. They were mothers. They had suffered labor pains but always under the promise of birth. The red-hot pains beneath the desert promised death only, as each bomb became stillborn. A contract was being drawn by the women who understood the fate of the earth as their own.

Under the cover of darkness, ten women slipped under the barbed-wire fence and entered the contaminated country. They were trespassing. They walked toward the town of Mercury in moonlight, taking their cues from coyote, kit fox, antelope ground squirrel, and quail. They moved quietly and deliberately through the maze of Joshua trees. When a hint of daylight appeared they rested, drinking tea and sharing their rations of food. The women closed their eyes. The time had come to protest with the heart, that to deny one's genealogy with the earth was to commit treason against one's soul.

At dawn, the women draped themselves in Mylar, wrapping long streamers of silver plastic around their arms to blow in the breeze. They wore clear masks that became the faces of humanity. And when they arrived on the edge of Mercury, they carried all the butterflies of a summer day in their wombs. They paused to allow their courage to settle.

The town, which forbids pregnant women and children to enter because of radiation risks to their health, was asleep. The women moved through the streets as winged messengers, twirling around each other in slow motion, peeking inside homes and watching the easy sleep of men and women. They were astonished by such stillness and periodically would utter a shrill note or low cry just to verify life.

The residents finally awoke to what appeared as strange apparitions. Some simply stared. Others called authorities, and in time, the women were apprehended by wary soldiers dressed in desert fatigues. They were taken to a white building on the other edge of Mercury. When asked who they were and why they were there, the women replied, "We are mothers and we have come to reclaim the desert for our children."

The soldiers arrested them. As the ten women were blindfolded and handcuffed, they began singing:

You can't forbid us everything
You can't forbid us to think...
You can't forbid our tears to flow
And you can't stop the songs that we sing.

The women continued to sing louder and louder, until they heard the voices of their sisters moving across the mesa. 

Ah nenah, nah
nin nah nah ...
Ah ne nah, nah
nin nah nah ...
Nyaga mutzi
oh ne nay ...
Nyaga mutzi
oh ne nay ...

"Call for reinforcements," one soldier said.

"We have," interrupted one woman. "We have ...and you have no idea of our numbers."

On March 18, 1988, I crossed the line at the Nevada Test Site and was arrested with nine other Utahns for trespassing on military lands. They are still conducting nuclear tests in the desert. Ours was an act of civil disobedience. But as I walked toward the town of Mercury, it was more than a gesture of peace. It was a gesture on behalf of the Clan of One-Breasted Women.

As one officer cinched the handcuffs around my wrists, another frisked my body. She found a pen and a pad of paper tucked inside my left boot.

"And these?" she asked sternly.

"Weapons," I replied.

Our eyes met. I smiled. She pulled the leg of my trousers back over my boot.

"Step forward, please," she said as she took my arm.

We were booked under an afternoon sun and bused to Tonopah, Nevada. It was a two-hour ride. This was familiar country to me. The Joshua trees standing their ground had been named by my ancestors who believed they looked like prophets pointing west to the promised land. These were the same trees that bloomed each spring, flowers appearing like white flames in the Mojave. And I recalled a full moon in May when my mother and I had walked among them, flushing out mourning doves and owls.

The bus stopped short of town. We were released. The officials thought it was a cruel joke to leave us stranded in the desert with no way to get home. What they didn't realize is that we were home, soul-centered and strong, women who recognized the sweet smell of sage as fuel for our spirits.

nin nah nah ... How gently they walk on the earth
Ah ne nah, nah ... Consider the rabbits
nin nah nah ... How gently they walk on the earth
Nyaga mutzi ... We remember them
oh ne nay ... We can walk gently also
Nyaga mutzi ... We remember them
oh ne nay ... We can walk gently also

The True Essence of Civilization

Chief Standing Bear, The Land of the Spotted Eagle, 1933

True, the white man brought great change. But the varied fruits of his civilization, though highly colored and inviting, are sickening and deadening. And if it be the part of civilization to maim, rob, and thwart, then what is progress? I am going to venture the man who sat on the ground in his tipi meditating on life and its meaning, accepting the kinship of all creatures, acknowledging unity with the universe of things, was infusing into his being the true essence of civilization. – Chief Standing Bear, The Land of the Spotted Eagle, 1933



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